Patients at the Royal make blueprints with Bluecoats

Making an Impact

The Royal, in collaboration with the Bluecoat Display Centre, has launched an interactive art project which involves patients in its Radiology Department creating 'camera-less photographs.'

For the past four Thursdays, the Royal had an artist in residence to help patients waiting for Radiology (X-Ray) tests to produce artwork using a process called Cyanotypes. This creates precise blue and white photographic images from objects, texts or acetates placed on sensitised paper. The process is how 'blue prints' were created in the early 19th Century.

The project is being led by Bluecoats affiliated artist Sian Hughes and is aimed at helping to reduce the anxiety of patients waiting for diagnostic tests and results. It is also about involving them and staff to create an artistic centre piece for the waiting area later, which will be installed later in the year.

Sian said: "This project at the Royal is part of the Bluecoat's 'Making an Impact'outreach project, which aims to reach new audiences and to demonstrate the benefits that craft can have on a person's health and wellbeing.

"Good health and wellbeing are reliant on an array of multiple factors, not just physical, but also psychological and social. We firmly believe that the arts have an important part to play in improving the health and wellbeing of people in many ways."

The project was piloted last Thursday and has received excellent feedback from patients and staff.

 

 

                                  

  

             

 

 

Gladys Rooney from Broadgreen, who was in the department to have a scan on her leg for a suspected blood clot, said: "It can be a nervous wait and this helps to relax you, take your mind of things and helps the time pass quicker. It also makes people talk to each other instead of all sitting in silence. They should do this in other departments. I was pleasantly surprised with the art work, I didn't think it would turn out so well." 

    
   

Jean Melling from Allerton, who was accompanying her daughter, said: "It helps to take the stress out of waiting for your tests and all this lovely art work helps to liven the place up and give the waiting area a bit more colour. I'm looking forward to taking my artwork home to show my grand-daughter, she'll be sorry she wasn't here to join in."

 

Liz McDonald, superintendent radiographer at the Royal, said: "This project has been fantastic for the patients involved and really helped to relax them and keep them occupied at what can be quite a nerve-racking time. And if our patients are relaxed and more at ease, then are staff are happy too.

"The art created will also be a wonderful addition to our waiting area, which will benefit future patients and staff for many years to come."

The final day of the project runs from 10am to 2pm on Thursday 28 March at the Royal in the Radiology department. Follow @RoyalLpoolHosps on Twitter for photos and comments throughout the day.


Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board

2003 - 2009

The Arts in Health Strategy was set up by Steve Brake,  Denbighshire County Council arts officer, with  the then Conwy and Denbighshire NHS Trust, and CywaithCumru.Artworks Wales.

Click here for this Gallery 

 

Caerphilly District Miners' Hospital    

 2001 - 2002

The Project was set up under Gwent Healthcare NHS Trust and  by CywaithCymru.Artworks Wales.  I worked with colleague Heather Parnell developing art for:

  • Caerphilly District Miners' Hospital
  • Ystrad Mynach Hospital
  • Redwood Hospital

Click here for this Gallery 

Stairway Mobile